C. E. Lawrence/Carole Buggé

Writer ~ Composer ~ Performer ~ Pianist


BBC's Sherlock: A Review by Carole Bugge

Sherlock Holmes Mystery Magazine #12 Paperback – April 24, 2014 ("click" here to visit magazine on Amazon)

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A short story

90th Anniversary Fiction – Slaughter House by Carole Bugge

Weird Tales No 362 Journal – January 1, 2014 ("click" here to visit the journal on Amazon)

Features Carole Bugge's short story 

"Why I Live at the Laundromat"

Semi Finalist the Ellen Gilchrist Prize in Short Fiction and will be Featured Poet in Issue #3

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"Sherlockians, there's cause to celebrate.... THE STAR OF INDIA is...a fine addition to the growing canon of Holmesian literature." (The Herald)

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WHO KILLED BLANCHE DUBOIS is an obsolutely and wonderfully clued story...captures the reader's imagination." (Romantic Times)

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Praise for C. E. Lawrence and Silent Screams

"A dark, intriguing thriller." (Publisher's Weekly)

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Silent Victim - "Lawrence keeps the adrenalin pumping, building suspense on both banks of the Hudson." (Chronogram)

Working on a historical thriller taking place in 19th century Edinburgh.

Completed the first one, Edinburgh Twilight and working on the sequel, Edinburgh Dusk.

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Available to appear at your BOOK CLUB MEETING

"Slaughter House" by Carole Bugge


The final story, labeled 90th Anniversary Fiction, is “Slaughter House” by Carole Bugge’ appears to be intended as a tribute to the late Richard Matheson.  It’s a grisly cautionary tale about spoiling one’s daughter and what happens when she doesn’t get what she wants.  It’s extremely well-written, and I wouldn’t mind seeing more work by Ms. Bugge’.–       Keith West, Adventures Fantastic      LINK to review


The last story is classified as 90th Anniversary Fiction, "Slaughter House" by Carole Bugge.  In "The Eyrie", editor Marvin Kaye tells us that it is "a prologue to the same-named story about a haunted house from the July 1953 issue", by Richard Matheson. A woman named Mary O'Gary looks back at her youth when she was maid to the Slaughter family, and especially their spoiled daughter, Clarissa. Her parents threw a grand party and two brothers, Jon and Saul Edelman, attend. Clarissa is attracted to Jon who ignores her so she flirts with Saul. Jon still ignores her. Clarissa is so bothered she settles into a "black depression" and must be hospitalized. When she is released, her parents throw another grand party and tragedy strikes. Richard Matheson would have heartily approved of this story. I can pay it no higher compliment. Sam Tomaino, SF Review, November 2014       LINK to review