China Grove, Third Edition, features Carole Buggé's short story,

"Why I live at the Laundromat"

She is also a semi-finalist in the Ellen Gilchrist Prize in Short Fiction,

and the Featured Poet in this edition. Copies of this edition for sale

on the China Grove press website (link below).

Click here to visit China Grove Press' website to purchase the 3rd Edition

Click here to visit China Grove Press' Facebook page

Re-release version, 2018.

Copyright 2020, C. E. Lawrence/Carole Lawrence/Carole Bugge/Elizabeth Blake. All rights reserved. 

Managed by Frank Goad, Frank Communications Lexington, www.thinkingonit.com

This is a book trailer video for Silent Slaughter, one of the Lee Campbell series of mysteries.

"Slaughter House" by Carole Bugge


"The final story, labeled 90th Anniversary Fiction, Slaughter House by Carole Buggé, appears to be intended as a tribute to the late Richard Matheson.  It’s a grisly cautionary tale about spoiling one’s daughter and what happens when she doesn’t get what she wants.  It’s extremely well-written, and I wouldn’t mind seeing more work by Ms. Buggé."

— Keith West, Adventures Fantastic —     LINK to review


"The last story is classified as 90th Anniversary Fiction, Slaughter House, by Carole Buggé.  In "The Eyrie", editor Marvin Kaye tells us that it is "a prologue to the same-named story about a haunted house from the July 1953 issue", by Richard Matheson. A woman named Mary O'Gary looks back at her youth when she was maid to the Slaughter family, and especially their spoiled daughter, Clarissa. Her parents threw a grand party and two brothers, Jon and Saul Edelman, attend. Clarissa is attracted to Jon who ignores her so she flirts with Saul. Jon still ignores her. Clarissa is so bothered she settles into a "black depression" and must be hospitalized. When she is released, her parents throw another grand party and tragedy strikes. Richard Matheson would have heartily approved of this story. I can pay it no higher compliment." 

— Sam Tomaino, SF Review, November 2014 —      LINK to review

family is in danger-a belief which proves to be horrifyingly accurate when, shortly after they arrive at Torre Abbey, a household member dies suddenly, mysteriously, and seemingly of fright. As strange sightings and threatening apparitions become almost commonplace, Holmes must uncover the secrets of the haunted abbey and the family that lives there if he is to have any hope of protecting the living and avenging the dead.
     In a case that taxes his wits, and seems beyond the reach of his usual methods, Holmes must grapple with his most deadly and unforgiving foe.

​"Watson, do you believe in ghosts?"

     With this question, Sherlock Holmes shatters the calm of a quiet evening in their London flat and, with Dr. John Watson at his side, embarks upon a particularly strange case. Holmes has received a request for aid from Lord Charles Cary, whose family is seemingly being threatened by ghosts in and around the family manor.
     The manor is Torre Abbey, a twelfth-century monastery in Torquay, Devon, and it has a long history of hauntings. While skeptical of the supernatural, Holmes does believe that the Cary

     Holmes and Watson find themselves caught up in a complex chess board of a problem, involving a clandestine love affair and the disappearance of a priceless sapphire. 
     Professor James Moriarty is back to tease and torment, leading the duo on a chase through the dark and dangerous back streets of London and beyond. 
     Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s timeless creation returns in a new series of handsomely designed detective stories. The Further Adventures series encapsulates the most varied and thrilling cases of the worlds’ greatest detective.